Showing posts with label art. Show all posts
Showing posts with label art. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

The Dumpster Project

 

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Mr. Mac Premo does collage and assemblage and has amassed a huge collection of, well, stuff… Now he  has to move to another, smaller studio. In stead of throwing all the… stuff… away, he decided to make art out of it. What a good idea!

He’ll tell you all about it in the video below…

 

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Magical Snap - 2011.07.23 19.20 - 103

 

Oh, and before I forget… He’s not only going to make art out of his stuff. He’s also painstakingly documenting all the stuff on a blog. You can check it out here… If you want.

 

The Dumpster Project from mac premo on Vimeo.

 

(Found via Notpaper)

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Ashley Wood Special (4)

 

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WARNING: If you take offense in pictures containing nudity and strong language, which could be considered in bad taste, I suggest you just skip this post.

Ashley Wood’s painting style could be seen as a direct descendant from painters like the impressionist and expressionist movement. A touch of Monet and Toulouse-Lautrec, a good dollop of Schiele, you get the idea… No surprise then, that he has a more than fleeting interest in the female form…

 

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Thursday, August 18, 2011

Shea Hembrey: 100 artists

 

A wonderful TED-talk by Shea Hembrey. It’s more fun if I just don’t say too much about it and let you go and watch it for yourselves…

It’s about art.

 

 

As often, there is a very lively discussion going on in the comments beneath the video on the TED site. Check it out if you’re interested.

Find more info on Shea Hembrey at www.sheahembrey.com

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Ashley Wood Special (3)

 

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One of the nice things about the work of Ashley Wood is the consistent graphic design it seems to surround itself with. What I didn’t know is that often, someone else happens to be responsible for the graphics, and that someone else happens to be a Belgian: a guy named Tom Muller. Take a look at the work here (probably not all of it is by Muller, I’m not always sure…) and if you want to see some more, check out Tom Muller at www.hellomuller.com.

And if you just came in, also check out part 1 and part 2, the previous installments of the Ashley Wood Special.

 

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Saturday, July 30, 2011

Brian Dettmer

 

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OK, I’m sorry. I know you probably have seen this before. It has been all around the internet, I know, I know… But I only saw it yesterday, and I’m still wowing, so I simply couldn’t resist posting this. So there you go.

He has been called “the book surgeon” and “the book slicer”, but his name is Brian Dettmer. You could say he’s a sculptor, making three dimensional objects, but at the same time he’s making images and making texts appear, so perhaps he is also a painter or a poet. Or a dada-remix-archeologist.

This is what he has to say about his working method:

 

 

In this work I begin with an existing book and seal its edges, creating an enclosed vessel full of unearthed potential. I cut into the surface of the book and dissect through it from the front.

I work with knives, tweezers and surgical tools to carve one page at a time, exposing each layer while cutting around ideas and images of interest. Nothing inside the books is relocated or implanted, only removed. Images and ideas are revealed to expose alternate histories and memories.

My work is a collaboration with the existing material and its past creators and the completed pieces expose new relationships of the book’s internal elements exactly where they have been since their original conception.

 

 

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Two videos: an interview and a presentation of work with comments by the artist himself.

 

 

 

One more video, worth checking out, which I couldn’t embed (for some reason?): Find it here.

 

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What did I say? Amazing work, isn’t it?

For more information find an interview with Brian Dettmer on www.mymodernmet.com or visit his own site at briandettmer.com

Friday, July 29, 2011

Ashley Wood Special (2)

 

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Besides being a prolific comic book artist, Ashley Wood is also a painter. On his blog he regularly posts what is on his easel that day. Finished pieces sit happily next to work just started. It seems he’s always working on something. He says:

 

I have to paint everyday, one day out, and it will take a week to get back into the zone, and that’s a week of self hate I can do without !

 

I love these photographs. Not only do you get a glimpse of the guy’s studio, you also get to see lot’s of the work up close and in different states of completion.

In case you are wondering: yes, I do know most of the paintings have robots, warriors or scantly clad ladies as their subject matter. Did I suddenly turn 16 again?

I remember reading about a painter - although I don’t remember who it was, sorry -  who explained why he liked the sort of paintings he liked most. He said he didn’t really enjoy abstract paintings, because he missed the subject matter, the possibilities of a story that a more figurative painting could have. And he didn’t really enjoy highly polished hyper-realistic paintings either, because he missed all the more abstract, painterly qualities like smears and brush strokes which often are so beautiful to look at. He liked work that had both: figurative work with a rough touch, so you’re mind could shift between seeing a yellowish stroke op paint and seeing the painted knee that the yellowish stroke evoked.

Scantly clad ladies, huge robots and blue that can’t decide whether it would turn red or not, what more can you want from a painting?

 

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Find the first part of the Ashley Wood Special here.

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